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Crime Reduction Toolkits

Trafficking of People

Crime - Let's bring it down
 
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Toolkit Index

Strategic initiatives

 

Strategic planning for a local response to trafficking in people should start with a strategic review. This should consider:

  • what local risks present themselves?

  • Are there entry points in the local area?

  • What is the local level of prostitution (especially off-street prostitution)?

  • Are there specific at-risk local labour markets (agricultural, construction, domestic service)?

  • what reviews of these risks have been carried out? What monitoring data on the extent of any problems is available?
     

  • what initiatives have already been taken and how effective have these been?
     

  • based on the above what do we now want to achieve?

This should highlight the key elements and priorities of a strategic action plan. Such an action plan should cover the requirements for:

  • specific proactive monitoring and data collection for the local sex industry and other at risk labour markets;
     

  • multi-agency development including:

  • awareness raising;

  • training;

  • identifying, resourcing and networking of service providers;
     

  • agreement of appropriate multi-agency protocols (for example for data and intelligence sharing, referrals to and between agencies, safety procedures, victim interviewing). 

Once an action plan has been developed, it is important that it is reviewed and that the findings of its component tasks should be responded to and acted upon. The aim above all should be to avoid multi-agency structures becoming bureaucratic and inhibiting of real progress. The aim of a strategic action plan is that it avoids agencies working against each other, and of time wasting resulting from lack of focus or misunderstanding of priorities. 

 

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