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Crime Reduction Toolkits

Rural Crime

Crime - Let's bring it down
 
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Toolkits Homepage
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Toolkits Content
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Introduction
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What do we know
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Local Solutions
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Tackling The Problem
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Making It Happen
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Resources
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Practical Tools
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Toolkit Index

Outline Approach

The pattern and distribution of crime in rural areas does not easily lend itself to the conventional hot spotting and analysis carried out in more urban areas with more volume crime.

It is important to utilise informal networks and the strength of the voluntary and community sector such as Rural Community Councils and Parish Councils These groups can help to identify the nature and extent of local crime and disorder problems

The importance of using people who work in remote areas as sources of information cannot be overstated.

Postal workers, milk deliverers, bus drivers, social services staff, teachers, youth workers, refuse collectors, ministers of religion and a wide variety of voluntary workers can be used to both relay and receive messages about crime and disorder.

Police stations are a visible form of reassurance for the public, but closure can often free up resources to maintain or improve service delivery over-all.

The Audit Commission report Action Stations: improving the management of the police estate,

http://www.audit-mmission.gov.uk/ac2/NRfirst.htm confirmed that public demand for access to police stations has reduced over time, particularly because of the greater use of better communications technology.

All forces therefore, including those that are predominantly rural, are likely to review regularly the number and location of their police stations.

A recent report on Tackling Crime in Rural Scotland states: ‘The most important resource is enthusiastic and committed volunteers or co-ordinators..Involving local people can provide a wealth of ideas and information. Successful projects increase public awareness of the problem and encourage people to be more vigilant and pro-active.

Contact; Linda Sinclair; Rural Affairs & Natural Heritage, The Scottish Office.

Tel;0131 244 7952 or visit the publications section at www.scotland.gov.uk

There are a variety of ways of determining local needs within rural areas

The Association of Councils for Rural England (ACRE) has wide experience of using a community development approach to assessing local needs.

"Village Appraisal ‘ ‘Planning for Real" and "Rapid Appraisal” are all effective techniques if used appropriately.

Software packages and booklets giving details of these methods are available from ACRE tel;01285 653477. www.acre.org.uk

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