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Dangerous dogs: have your say

  • Published: Tuesday, 9 March 2010

A public consultation has been launched to discuss changes to the 1991 Dangerous Dogs Act. Find out how dog owners might be affected.

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Have your say

You can contribute your views at the Defra website

Dog owners could be required to insure themselves against the risk of their pet attacking someone.

With dog crime on the rise, the government has launched a public consultation on amending the 1991 Dangerous Dogs Act. Under the new proposals police and local authorities could be given powers to force owners of dangerous dogs to muzzle them.

More than 100 people are treated for dog bites every week, and there's growing evidence that gangs are using certain breeds as status symbols - or in some cases as weapons.

Michael Ebberson was walking his terrier when he and his pet were viciously attacked by two dogs.

Michael Ebberson, dog attack victim: "One was circling, while the other was attacking me. He severed my arm, broke my finger, and also fractured my fingers. He bit me all over my arms and body. In the end, the Armed Response Unit had to be called, and they had to shoot the dog four times."

Currently it's only against the law if a dog is out of control in a public place. But the government wants to extend that to private residences as well: the idea being that people like postmen would be protected.

If you would like to contribute to the public consultation on these proposals, go to the Defra website.

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