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Introduction to freight

The Department for Transport (DfT) sets regulations for and undertakes research into freight transport.  The DfT also manages initiatives such as freight grants to encourage the transport of freight by rail or water rather than by road; a practice that is efficient, resilient, environmentally-friendly and safe.


Freight grants


Taking freight off congested roads and moving it by rail or water can sometimes be more expensive than road transportation.  Freight grants are designed to facilitate the purchase of the environmental and social benefits that result from using rail or water transport. 

The environmental benefits are calculated by working out how many lorry journeys will be removed by transporting freight by rail or water. 
The environmental benefits of a mode shift proposal can be calculated by using the on-line environmental benefit calculator.


Freight best practice


The Freight Best Practice programme is funded by the DfT and offers a range of guides, case studies, software and seminars to freight operators, on topics such as saving fuel, developing skills, equipment and systems, operational efficiency and performance management.


Carriage of dangerous goods


Most goods consigned for carriage pose no danger to those involved in transporting them, or to members of the public or the environment.  However, some goods are potentially hazardous and so the carriage of dangerous goods must comply with domestic and international legislation.


The UN Model Regulations are the basis for Agreements governing the international carriage of dangerous goods: the UK's domestic regulations implement these Agreements (which includes ADR and RID).