This snapshot, taken on
01/12/2002
, shows web content acquired for preservation by The National Archives. External links, forms and search may not work in archived websites and contact details are likely to be out of date.
 
 
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Q:  Why are consular fees so high?
A:  The fees are laid down by Parliament and are calculated to recover the costs involved in providing the service.

Q:  How can I comment / complain about the service I have received?
A:  Each Consulate will give details on how to make a complaint. Details on the complaints procedure are also available on this website.

Q:  I plan to move overseas permanently. How can the Embassy help me on arrival?
A:  It is always a good idea to get in touch with the Consulate if you are going to live in the area permanently. They can often help you with practical advice and useful contact numbers. In some countries we ask British nationals to register with the Consulate so that we can get in touch with them in times of unrest.

Q:  I live overseas, how can I register to vote?
A:  To vote in UK elections your name must appear on the electoral register. Once registered as an overseas elector, you will be able to vote in Parliamentary elections and European Parliamentary elections in the UK, but not in local government elections.

The electoral register is compiled by each local authority and is not maintained by a central organisation. This means you must contact the electoral registration officer at the local council where you were last registered as an elector when living in the UK. If you left the UK before you were old enough to register, you should contact the electoral registration officer for the area where you last lived. They can send you the relevant forms. For contact details for your local council visit UpMyStreet and enter the postcode of your last UK address.

You can register to vote as an overseas elector for up to 20 years after you were last registered in the UK. However, from 1 April 2002 the law is due to change and overseas electors will only be eligible to register for up to 15 years after they were last registered.

The Register of Electors is now updated every month. You can return your application form at any time but the electoral registration office must receive the form within 3 months of you signing and dating it. You will need to register each year. The electoral registration office should send you a reminder 2-3 months before your registration expires (as long as you remain qualified). With your registration form, you will also be sent information on proxy and postal voting.

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