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Wednesday, 22 September 2010

Eye problems and driving

Eye problems are conditions that you may need to tell the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) about.

Car or motorcycle driving licence holders

If you have sight in one eye only
You will need to meet the visual acuity and visual field standards set out below to allow you to continue driving. You need to be aware that it may take several months for you to adapt safely to driving with one eye. In particular your ability to judge distances accurately may be affected and you may not be so aware of objects to each side of you.

If only one eye is affected by a medical condition
You will need to meet the visual acuity and visual field standards set out below to allow you to continue driving.

Following the removal of cataracts
If you have had surgery to remove cataracts you will need to meet the visual acuity and visual field standards set out below to allow you to continue driving.

All drivers must be able to read a standard size number plate (with glasses or corrective lenses if necessary) from 20.5 metres (67 feet) or 20 metres (65 feet) where narrower characters (50 milimetres wide) are displayed. This requirement is specified in law and any person driving on a public highway who is unable to do this is guilty of an offence. You should also be aware that if the police have reason to suspect that a driver is driving with defective vision they can require the driver to take a 'number plate test'. You can keep a regular check that you meet the standards by doing the ‘number plate test’ yourself.

Visual field standards
All drivers must ensure that they have an adequate field of vision. A field of vision is the entire area that can be seen without moving the eye. To meet the standards for driving your peripheral (side) vision must be a specific width and you must not have any significant defects in the centre of the field of vision. A person with total loss of sight in one eye must not have any defect in the visual field of the remaining eye. If you have any doubt about whether you can meet the requirements, your GP, optician or eye specialist will be able to advise you.

If your condition affects both eyes                                         

If your condition affect both eyes - you will need to tell DVLA about your medical condition.

To tell DVLA please download the medical questionnaire 'V1' and send it to DVLA.

Bus, coach or lorry driving licence holders

If you hold a bus, coach or lorry driving licence - you will need to tell DVLA about your medical condition.

To tell DVLA please download the medical questionnaire 'V1V' and send it to DVLA.

Where to send your completed questionnaire

You can send your completed questionnaire to DVLA by fax or post.

Fax
0845 850 0095

Post
Drivers Medical Group
DVLA
Swansea
SA99 1DF

If you suffer from any other condition please navigate to the relevant page using the A to Z.

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Additional links

Medical A to Z

Search the DVLA's medical conditions A to Z to see if you need to notify DVLA

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