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Delivering Race Equality: A Framework for Action

  • Launch date:
    1 October 2003
  • Closing date:
    27 February 2004
  • Creator/s:
    Department of Health
  • Audience:
    Health and social care professionals
  • Copyright holder:
    Crown

This sets out what those planning, delivering and monitoring local primary care and mental health services need to do to improve services for users, relatives and carers from Black and minority ethnic communities.

It asks for views on what needs to be done at national level to provide support and leadership to those carrying out this work.

Concerns have been expressed over a number of years that mental health services are not being delivered to people from Black and minority ethnic (BME) communities experiencing mental illness and distress in a way that is appropriate to their needs. The Department has drafted DELIVERING RACE EQUALITY: A FRAMEWORK FOR ACTION for consultation.

Consultation process

The consultation will be undertaken in a number of ways:

by written comments and information to DH directly (see below);

  • through consultation events organised by the NIMHE Development Centres - more information will be available on the NIMHE website during October/December;
  • by discussion and events co-ordinated by Mental Health Local Implementation Teams (LITs) (please contact your LIT to see if anything is planned);
  • by the National Strategic Director, Professor Kamlesh Patel, meeting and consulting with a range of key stakeholders in the statutory and VCS sectors.

PLEASE RESPOND BY 27TH FEBRUARY 2004.

Representative groups who respond to this consultation should provide a summary of the people and organisations they represent.

Responses will be made public unless confidentiality is specifically asked for.

If you have any comments or complaints about the consultation process please contact: Steve Wells (Consultations Co-ordinator) 020 7972 6073 - steve.wells@doh.gov.uk

The information you send to us may need to be passed to colleagues within the Department of Health and/or published in a summary of responses to this consultation. We will assume that you are content for us to do this and if you are replying by e-mail, that your consent overrides any confidentiality disclaimer that is generated by your organisation's IT system, unless you specifically include a request to the contrary in the main text of your submission to us.

Code of Practice criteria

  1. Timing of consultation should be built into the planning process for a policy (including legislation) or service from the start, so that it has the best prospect of improving the proposals concerned, and so that sufficient time is left for it at each stage.
  2. It should be clear who is being consulted, about what questions, in what time-scale and for what purpose.
  3. A consultation document should be as simple and concise as possible. It should include a summary, in two pages at most, of the main questions it seeks views on. It should make it as easy as possible for readers to respond, make contact or complain.
  4. Documents should be widely available, with the fullest use of electronic means (though not to the exclusion of others) and effectively be drawn to the attention of interested groups and individuals.
  5. Sufficient time should be allowed for considered responses from all groups with an interest. Twelve weeks should be the standard minimum period for a consultation.
  6. Responses should be carefully and open-mindedly analysed, and the results made widely available, with an account of the views expressed, and reasons for decisions finally taken.
  7. Departments should monitor and evaluate consultations, designating a consultation co-ordinator who will ensure the lessons are disseminated.
  • Contact:
    Kevin Mantle
  • Address:
    315 Wellington House
    Department of Health, 133-155 Waterloo House
    London
    United Kingdom
    SE1 8UG
  • Phone:
    Phone number
    020 7972 4364
  • Fax:
    Fax number020 7972 4147
  • Email:

Summary of Consultation Questions

Information/monitoring

Aim: Compliance with RR(A)A 2000 duties relating to assessing/monitoring impact of services.

Ethnicity taken into account in:

  • planning and delivery of services to individuals;
  • collective planning and delivery and monitoring of services.

1.Are there any barriers to services meeting their obligations in relation to the collection and use of ethnicity data? Please give any examples of plans to overcome these barriers or how they have already been overcome.

Appropriate and responsive services

Aims: Compliance with RR(A)A 2000 training duty. Appropriateness and responsiveness of mental health services to Black and minority ethnic communities assessed and monitored, with action taken where appropriate. Staff given tools to enable them to deliver services to and in partnership with all groups in the local community with confidence and sensitivity. Patient experience improved

2.Are there any barriers to services meeting their obligations and commitments in relation to providing services that are appropriate and responsive to the needs and wishes of Black and minority ethnic communities? Please give any examples of plans to overcome these barriers or how they have already been overcome.

3.What sort of support would services find helpful from other bodies (e.g. NIMHE Development Centres, Workforce Development Confederations) in this area?

4.What do communities/VCS think they can contribute to helping services become more appropriate and responsive?

Community engagement

Aims: Compliance with statutory obligations under Health and Social Care Act 2001 and RR(A)A 2000 in relation to informing, involving and consulting with communities, and requirement under MHNSF Standard 1 to work with vulnerable groups and individuals at risk and to tackle social exclusion. Black and minority ethnic communities including VCS more effectively and sustainably involved in planning, designing, commissioning and delivery of services. Patient experience improved.

5.Are there any barriers to services meeting their obligations and commitments in relation toworking with Black and minority ethnic communities? Please give any examples of plans to overcome these barriers or how they have already been overcome.

6.What sort of support would services find helpful from other bodies (e.g. NIMHE Development Centres, Workforce Development Confederations) to help their organisations take forward this work, other than that described above?

7.What issues do communities and the VCS think are particularly important?

8.What do communities and VCS think they can contribute to helping create a partnership with services?

Suicide prevention

Aims: Help achieve national target on suicide reduction. Needs of high-risk groups taken into account in treatment and service planning.

9.Are there any barriers to services taking forward the Suicide Prevention Strategy in relation to vulnerable Black and minority ethnic groups? Please give any examples of plans to overcome these barriers or how they have already been overcome.

10.What support would communities and the VCS find helpful in relation to this area?

Pathways to care

Aims: Remedy adverse impact under RR(A)A 2000. Black and minority ethnic pathways to care monitored and action taken where appropriate.

11.Are there any barriers to services creating a better pathway into and out of mental health services for Black and minority ethnic users, including relationships with other agencies? Please give any examples of plans to overcome these barriers or how they have already been overcome.

12.What sort of support would services find helpful from other bodies in this area?

13.What is the role of other agencies in helping achieve more acceptable pathways to care for Black and minority ethnic users?

14.What impact do services and communities/VCS think that the new workers/teams under the MH Modernisation Programme have had on this issue?

15.What do communities/VCS think they can contribute to helping services improve user pathways?

Acute inpatient facilities

Aims: Remedy adverse impact under RR(A)A 2000 and compliance with Human Rights Act Provision of care in acute inpatient facilities more appropriate to needs of male and female Black and minority ethnic patients, and treatment more effective in aiding their recovery.

16.Are there any barriers to services meeting their obligations and commitments in relation to improving acute inpatient facilities for Black and minority ethnic users?

17.Please give any examples of plans to overcome these barriers or how they have already been overcome.

18.What do communities/VCS think are the main areas in which improvements should be made in acute inpatient facilities for Black and minority ethnic users and their relatives and carers?

19.What has been the impact of new structures such as the Acute Care Forums?

20.How else can communities/VCS contribute to helping services improve these facilities for Black and minority ethnic users and carers?

Contact Information

Please respond by 27th February 2004 in writing or e-mail to:

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