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05/08/2009
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Data Protection Tribunal

Home Office

K1 Brief description of the tribunal's business. Hears appeals by data controllers against various types of enforcement notice issued by the Data Protection Commissioner.

In addition, a specially constituted panel of the tribunal hears appeals by directly affected persons against certificates signed by a Minister of the Crown, certifying the need to exempt personal data from certain provisions of the Data Protection Act 1998 for the purpose of safeguarding national security.

Tribunal also hears appeals by persons against whom various types of enforcement notice have been issued by the Commissioner in respect of requirements of the Telecommunications (Data Protection and Privacy) Regulations; and its specially constituted panel will hear appeals by directly affected persons against certificates signed by a Minister of the Crown certifying that exemption from any requirement of these Regulations is required for the purpose of safeguarding national security.

K2 Cases received:
Total disposals in the year:
     disputes resolved:
     otherwise disposed of:
Pending at the end of the year:
4
1
1
0
3
K3 Time taken to deal with a case, from first receipt to final disposal, and the time taken to implement the tribunal's decision. Varies according to complexity. Normally less than six months. procedural rules specify time limits for certain stages of the proceedings (eg for appeals, responses), and allow the tribunal to give directions (with time limits) to enable parties to prepare. Tribunal required to give hearing notification as soon as practicable, and with due regard to convenience of the parties.

Time taken to implement determinations depends on their nature: if the tribunal were to allow an appeal against an enforcement notice, the notice would cease to have effect at that point; if the tribunal were to substitute an alternative notice, it would specify relevant time limits.

K4 For appeal tribunals, the percentage of appeals which succeed. Generally vary terms of notices rather than allow or dismiss an appeal.
K5 Managerial structures for the tribunal administration: Tribunal provided with a Secretary and deputy secretary by the Home Secretary to assist it to discharge its functions. They are appointed by the tribunal chairmen as proper officers for the purposes of the appeals procedural rules.
K6 How tribunal outcomes are fed back into departmental/agency decision-making, and used to identify and correct problems with the substantive law, or departmental policies and service delivery? Tribunal determinations inform the Data Protection Commissioner's assessments of compliance with the Data Protection Act and are reflected in any guidance issued by her. (The Commissioner administers the legislation independently of government.) There have been to date no appeals involving government departments or agencies.

If any tribunal determinations were to indicate the need for a change in the Data Protection Act, the Home Office would consider the matter carefully.

K7 Nature and scope of current ICT systems, and any major plans for improvement. The tribunal does not have its own dedicated IT system. Its secretariat uses standard Home Office ICT systems (desktop computers, with e-mail and Internet facilities).

Consideration is being given to establishing a tribunal website.

K8 How the tribunal(s) fit in the department's Modernising Government strategy. The Home Office is currently undergoing a sustained modernisation programme, particularly in IT development, and the Tribunal secretariat benefits from this.
K9 Numbers and grades of staff engaged on providing administrative support to the tribunal. 1xHEO (Secretary)
1xEO (Deputy Secretary)
K12 Performance and user satisfaction measures in the tribunal. None so far developed.
K13 Arrangements for assistance for users, legal or otherwise (including legal aid). Legal aid is not available.

It is open to appellants to appoint a representative. In practice, all appeals to date have been by companies, rather than individuals. The procedural rules impose a general duty on the tribunal to seek to avoid formality in its proceedings so far as is appropriate.

K14 Arrangements for providing hearings (including their locations). Given the small number of appeals, the Tribunal has no permanent building for hearings. The secretariat makes accommodation arrangements
K15 The extent to which the tribunal's practices and procedures have been reviewed for conformity to ECHR requirements, and any particular concerns which have been identified. New procedural rules for enforcement appeals and national security appeals came into force on 1 March 2000. These rules were framed with ECHR compliance in mind, and after consultation with the Council on Tribunals.
K16 Arrangements for appointing tribunal members, both legally and otherwise qualified. Chairman and Deputy Chairman (both legally qualified) appointed by the Lord Chancellor, after consultation with the Secretary of State for Scotland.

Lay members are appointed by the Hoe Secretary to represent the interests of data subjects and data controllers.

The national security panel will comprise deputy chairmen who have been designated by the Lord Chancellor to be capable of hearing such appeals.

K17 Number of members of the tribunal, by category of appointment and whether full-time or part-time (in the latter case, with an average number of sitting days each year); and rates of pay. 1 Chairman - part-time (405 per day)

1 Deputy Chairman - part-time(316 per day)

19 lay members (6 representing data subjects, 13 data controllers) - part-time (227 per day)

National security panel will initially comprise three deputy chairmen, one of whom will be designated to preside.

K18 Arrangements for training tribunal members, and the approach to and content of training. Small number of appeals (some members are not called upon to hear any at all during their term of appointment) the tribunal has not hitherto provided any training for members - although the chairman and deputy chairman have attended HRA training, and reference material on the act will be made available for use at hearings.
K19 Arrangements for staff training. Secretariat staff receive Home Office training in their duties, including HRA training.
K20 Resources expended on: Information on expenditure has not been provided
a tribunal member salaries and expenses
b staff salaries and expenses
c system administration
d accommodation;
e tribunal member training
f staff training
  TOTAL:

Police Appeals Tribunals

Home Office

K1 Brief description of the tribunal's business. Hear appeals against charges or offences under either the Police (Discipline) Regulations 1985 or the Police (Conduct) Regulations 1999 ( Endnote 1 )where the chief officer of police has found the charge(s) against him proved. Under the 1985 Regulations the Home Secretary appointed the tribunal who appointed to him. Under the 1999 regulations, the Police Authority for the relevant police force appoints the tribunal, and the Home Secretary is not directly involved.
K2 Cases received:
Total disposals in the year:
     disputes resolved:
     otherwise disposed of:
Pending at the end of the year:
70 cases went to appeal
5 were allowed on appeal against finding and punishment
1 had the punishment varied on appeal against finding and punishment
8 had the punishment varied on appeal against punishment only
12 were dismissed on appeal against finding and punishment
30 were dismissed on appeal against punishment only
4 were dismissed on appeal against finding only
10 were withdrawn.
K3 Time taken to deal with a case, from first receipt to final disposal, and the time taken to implement the tribunal's decision. Under the 1985 Regulations from laying the charge to the final decision took from 14 months to eight years in the Metropolitan Police. (Smaller forces were not necessarily quicker.) Discipline/misconduct proceedings cannot start until any related criminal proceedings are resolved.
K4 For appeal tribunals, the percentage of appeals which succeed. 8% allowed, 15% allowed to some extent.
K5 Managerial structures for the tribunal administration: Under the 1985 Regulations, one AO in the Home Office sets up and supports the tribunals, but work is also done in police forces and by the clerks to the barristers who chair the tribunals.

Under the 1999 Regulations, the police authorities will administer the tribunals.

K6 How tribunal outcomes are fed back into departmental/agency decision-making, and used to identify and correct problems with the substantive law, or departmental policies and service delivery? The Home Office Police Leadership and Powers Unit (PLPU) see all cases and, in writing submissions to ministers, have a quality control role. The Inspectorate of Constabulary also see all appeal cases after the Home Secretary's decision has been notified to the appellant, and they can give words of advice to the chief officer if necessary.

A Home Office working group, involving all the police staff associations is monitoring how the new regulations are working.

K7 Nature and scope of current ICT systems, and any major plans for improvement. No information provided.
K8 How the tribunal(s) fit in the department's Modernising Government strategy. They do not do so specifically.
K9 Numbers and grades of staff engaged on providing administrative support to the tribunal. 1xAO in the Home Office

Figures are not available centrally for the amount of support given in each police force and elsewhere.

K12 Performance and user satisfaction measures in the tribunal. None.
K13 Arrangements for assistance for users, legal or otherwise (including legal aid). In all cases a police officer may have his case presented by a member of the force, selected as a "Friend". If punishment is likely to be one of the three most serious (dismissal, requirement to resign or reduction in rank) the appellant may elect to be legally represented.
K14 Arrangements for providing hearings (including their locations). No formal arrangements exist, but since the appeal is against the decision of the Chief Officer, the relevant police force provides accommodation which is usually in police premises. So there are up to 43 venues in England and Wales. Home Office provide general advice on the type of room, the need to escort tribunal members, tape recording, etc.
K15 The extent to which the tribunal's practices and procedures have been reviewed for conformity to ECHR requirements, and any particular concerns which have been identified. Home Office have considered ECHR compliance in consultation with the Association of Chief Police Officers Human Rights sub- committee.
K16 Arrangements for appointing tribunal members, both legally and otherwise qualified. Three categories of members:

  1. Chairmen, who must be barristers of solicitors, are appointed by the Lord Chancellor.

  2. Serving or retired inspector of constabulary or retired chief officer, nominated by HM Inspectorate of Constabulary

  3. Retired officers of appropriate rank, nominated by Police Federation and Superintendents' Association.

K17 Number of members of the tribunal, by category of appointment and whether full-time or part-time (in the latter case, with an average number of sitting days each year); and rates of pay. 11 Chairmen
12 second members
18 third members.

No information has been provided on sitting days or rates of pay.
K18 Arrangements for training tribunal members, and the approach to and content of training. No training is given beyond basic guidance.
K19 Arrangements for staff training. No training specific to tribunals given.
K20 Resources expended on:  
a tribunal member salaries and expenses No information has been provided.
b staff salaries and expenses
c system administration
d accommodation;
e tribunal member training
f staff training
  TOTAL:

Endnotes:

  1. New procedures under the 1999 regulations have only been operating since April 1 1999, they are still very recent and have yet to be evaluated. Information in the main relates to appeals under the 1985 regulations.

Criminal Injuries Compensation Appeals Panel

Home Office

K1 Brief description of the tribunal's business. Hears appeals against decisions made and reviewed by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority on applications for compensation as a result of injuries received from crimes of violence, and also providing advice to Ministers in accordance with the Criminal Injuries Compensation Act 1995.
K2 Cases received:
Total disposals in the year:
     disputes resolved:
     otherwise disposed of:
Pending at the end of the year:
7050
5200
4850
350
7400
K3 Time taken to deal with a case, from first receipt to final disposal, and the time taken to implement the tribunal's decision. 7.8 months.

The Panel does not itself implement a decision but directs the Authority to pay. Its target is to ensure that the Authority is instructed to make a payment within 10 working days of the decision. The Authority's target is to make payment within 28 days of receipt of Panel's decision.

K4 For appeal tribunals, the percentage of appeals which succeed. Eligibility appeals: 40% (25% wholly successful, 15% received reduced award)

Assessment appeals: 60%

K5 Managerial structures for the tribunal administration: Panel headed by a (p/t) chairman, accountable to the Home Secretary for operation and finance matters, who is the Panel's Accounting Officer, and who chairs a Management Committee.

Panel also has an Audit Committee, responsible for advising Chairman and Management Committee on matters of internal control. A complaints sub-committee has been set up.

A Medical Committee considers amendments under Section 28 of the Scheme.

A Secretariat is headed up by the Panel Secretary, a Home Office civil servant.

K6 How tribunal outcomes are fed back into departmental/agency decision-making, and used to identify and correct problems with the substantive law, or departmental policies and service delivery? At several levels:

  1. Presenting Officers at hearings, who are CICA staff, report back on individual cases.

  2. Chairmen and members informally report issues to the Panel Chairman.

  3. Panel Chairman and Secretary have formal meetings with CICA staff.

  4. Panel Chairman in frequent informal contact with CICA management.

  5. Quarterly meetings with CICA and the Home Office to discuss performance and issues.

  6. Medical Committee reviews tariffs and reports through the Chairman to the Home Office.

  7. Panel responded to the Home Secretary's 1999 review of criminal injuries.

K7 Nature and scope of current ICT systems, and any major plans for improvement. Staff have access to CICA database which records decisions, tracks files and correspondence, and provides reports. Major upgrade planned.
K8 How the tribunal(s) fit in the department's Modernising Government strategy. Electronic delivery of business - website up and running, provision for electronic appeals.

Staff management - bonus payments to recognise valuable work.

User-orientated delivery of service.

K9 Numbers and grades of staff engaged on providing administrative support to the tribunal. 2xSEO (one is the Panel Secretary)
4xHEO (one of which is a 'consultant')
69 other staff.
K12 Performance and user satisfaction measures in the tribunal. Objectives:

  • To resolve promptly an optimum number of appeals within an agreed timescale.

  • To process and resolve appeals efficiently.

Key Performance Indicators:

  • Volume of appeals resolved within planned financial provision and within time target.

  • Average number of appeals resolved in a working day.

  • Average unit cost of appeals resolved.

Targets:

  • 80% of appeals should be resolved within 6 months of receipt of notice.

  • Number of appeals resolved (99-00 target was 6000)

  • 8 appeals in each hearings day.

K13 Arrangements for assistance for users, legal or otherwise (including legal aid). Legal aid is not available.

Users are advised of the assistance available from Victim Support, and told they may be assisted by a friend.

A proportion of appellants have their appeal funded by their Unions.

K14 Arrangements for providing hearings (including their locations). Hearings are generally arranged at a city centre location suitable for applicants or (police) witnesses. Locations used last year were London, Glasgow, Manchester, Liverpool, Birmingham, Leeds, York, Preston, Nottingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Plymouth, Dundee, and Aberdeen.

NAO noted that (expensive) hotel accommodation was often used as the Panel was unable to use Court or Tribunal accommodation.

K15 The extent to which the tribunal's practices and procedures have been reviewed for conformity to ECHR requirements, and any particular concerns which have been identified. Procedures have been reviewed.
K16 Arrangements for appointing tribunal members, both legally and otherwise qualified. Appointments made by the Home Office are in line with Nolan principles (open advertising and interview). Ministers consider (and largely adopt) recommendations by an interviewing panel, which includes the Panel Chairman and two independent members.
K17 Number of members of the tribunal, by category of appointment and whether full-time or part-time (in the latter case, with an average number of sitting days each year); and rates of pay. 145 part-time members.

Including:

22 lawyers under the old scheme until March 2002.

123 members (57 of whom are legally qualified)

Average of 40 sitting days a year (although a shortage of experienced lawyers means those that are able sit for more days)

Payment is 325 per day.

K18 Arrangements for training tribunal members, and the approach to and content of training.
  1. Annual seminar for all members (two days in 2000)

  2. All new members sit as observers with an experienced chairman for two days, who provides tuition. Then sit as fourth member of panels to gain experience.

  3. Internal day-long seminars are held for chairs (either legally qualified or lay). Panel Chairman will sit with new chairmen before they chair panels.

  4. Literature is provided.

  5. New members are provided with mentors.

K19 Arrangements for staff training. Ongoing by way of courses and individual tuition.
K20 Resources expended on:  
a tribunal member salaries and expenses 1,074,000
b staff salaries and expenses 1,177,000
c system administration 1,100,000
d accommodation; 830,000
e tribunal member training 0 (recruitment exercise during the year meant that training was held at end of previous year and beginning of following year. Training costs of the order of 140,000 incurred the following year)
f staff training 18,400
  TOTAL: 4,199,900

Misuse of Drugs Tribunal

Home Office

K1 Brief description of the tribunal's business. Considers whether there are grounds for making a direction against a practitioner prohibiting him from prescribing controlled drugs. Cases are referred to the tribunal by the Secretary of State.
K2 Cases received:
Total disposals in the year:
     disputes resolved:
     otherwise disposed of:
Pending at the end of the year:
Last tribunal was held in 1994 There are none planned for the immediate future.
K3 Time taken to deal with a case, from first receipt to final disposal, and the time taken to implement the tribunal's decision. One to four days to deal with a case.
K4 For appeal tribunals, the percentage of appeals which succeed. This information is not available.
K5 Managerial structures for the tribunal administration: The Home Office provides the tribunal secretariat. It consists of a Grade 7 Secretary and an EO Assistant Secretary.
K6 How tribunal outcomes are fed back into departmental/agency decision-making, and used to identify and correct problems with the substantive law, or departmental policies and service delivery? Not applicable.
K7 Nature and scope of current ICT systems, and any major plans for improvement. Not applicable.
K8 How the tribunal(s) fit in the department's Modernising Government strategy. Not applicable.
K9 Numbers and grades of staff engaged on providing administrative support to the tribunal. 1xGrade 7 (Secretary)
1x EO (Assistant Secretary)
K12 Performance and user satisfaction measures in the tribunal. Not applicable.
K13 Arrangements for assistance for users, legal or otherwise (including legal aid). Legal aid is not available. Sums are payable by way of compensation for the loss of time and travelling and other allowances.
K14 Arrangements for providing hearings (including their locations). Accommodation is hired as and when necessary.
K15 The extent to which the tribunal's practices and procedures have been reviewed for conformity to ECHR requirements, and any particular concerns which have been identified. This information has not been provided.
K16 Arrangements for appointing tribunal members, both legally and otherwise qualified. This information has not been provided.
K17 Number of members of the tribunal, by category of appointment and whether full-time or part-time (in the latter case, with an average number of sitting days each year); and rates of pay. This information has not been provided.
K18 Arrangements for training tribunal members, and the approach to and content of training. This information has not been provided.
K19 Arrangements for staff training. This information has not been provided.
K20 Resources expended on:  
a tribunal member salaries and expenses This information has not been provided.
b staff salaries and expenses
c system administration
d accommodation;
e tribunal member training
f staff training
  TOTAL:

Interception of Communications Tribunal,
Security Services Tribunal, Intelligence Services Tribunal

Home Office

K1 Brief description of the tribunal's business. Interception of Communications Tribunal: Deals with complaints against the use of the power to intercept communications under the Interception of Communications Act 1985.

Security Service Tribunal: Deals with complaints against the actions of the Security Service

Intelligence Services Tribunal: Deals with complaints against the actions of SIS and GCHQ.

These tribunals have been replaced by the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000) and exist now only to consider complaints made before 2 October 2000.

K2 Cases received:
Total disposals in the year:
     disputes resolved:
     otherwise disposed of:
Pending at the end of the year:
Interception of Communications Tribunal: 69 complaints in 1999. Investigation of 67 was completed, along with three cases left from 1998. Two cases were carried over into 2000.

Security Service Tribunal: 22 complaints in 1999. Investigation of 19 was completed, along with 12 cases left over from 1998. Three were carried over.

Intelligence Services Tribunal: Five complaints in 1999. All five were investigated along with four from 1998.

K3 Time taken to deal with a case, from first receipt to final disposal, and the time taken to implement the tribunal's decision. Cases can vary in complexity and there is no standard time to deal with each one.
K4 For appeal tribunals, the percentage of appeals which succeed. These are not appeal tribunals.
K5 Managerial structures for the tribunal administration: Interception of Communications Tribunal: Para 6, schedule 1, Interception of Communications Act 1985.

Security Service Tribunal: Para 6, Schedule 2, Security Services Act 1989.

Intelligence Services Tribunal: Para 6, Schedule 2, Intelligence Services Act 1994.

K6 How tribunal outcomes are fed back into departmental/agency decision-making, and used to identify and correct problems with the substantive law, or departmental policies and service delivery? No complaints upheld to date.
K7 Nature and scope of current ICT systems, and any major plans for improvement. No bespoke IT systems due to minimal caseload.
K8 How the tribunal(s) fit in the department's Modernising Government strategy. Tribunals now abolished to be replaced by one more accessible tribunal.
K9 Numbers and grades of staff engaged on providing administrative support to the tribunal. One HEO to cover the three tribunals.
K12 Performance and user satisfaction measures in the tribunal. None.
K13 Arrangements for assistance for users, legal or otherwise (including legal aid). Legal representation is permitted but legal aid is not available.
K14 Arrangements for providing hearings (including their locations). No provision for hearings. cases dealt with on a paper basis.
K15 The extent to which the tribunal's practices and procedures have been reviewed for conformity to ECHR requirements, and any particular concerns which have been identified. Tribunals have been abolished and replaced with the ECHR-compliant Investigatory Powers Tribunal.
K16 Arrangements for appointing tribunal members, both legally and otherwise qualified. All members appointed by HM the Queen by Letters Patent, and on the recommendation of the Prime Minister.
K17 Number of members of the tribunal, by category of appointment and whether full-time or part-time (in the latter case, with an average number of sitting days each year); and rates of pay. For the three tribunals, two Presidents and six other members. (Paid 316 per day)
K18 Arrangements for training tribunal members, and the approach to and content of training. Tribunals now abolished.
K19 Arrangements for staff training. Tribunals now abolished.
K20 Resources expended on:  
a tribunal member salaries and expenses
b staff salaries and expenses
c system administration
d accommodation;
e tribunal member training
f staff training
  TOTAL: 70,000 (approximately) for all three tribunals.

Office of the Surveillance Commissioners (OSC)

Home Office

K1 Brief description of the tribunal's business. Interception of Communications Tribunal: Deals with complaints against the use of the power to intercept communications under the Interception of Communications Act 1985.

Security Service Tribunal: Deals with complaints against the actions of the Security Service

Intelligence Services Tribunal: Deals with complaints against the actions of SIS and GCHQ.

These tribunals have been replaced by the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000) and exist now only to consider complaints made before 2 October 2000.

K2 Cases received:
Total disposals in the year:
     disputes resolved:
     otherwise disposed of:
Pending at the end of the year:
Interception of Communications Tribunal: 69 complaints in 1999. Investigation of 67 was completed, along with three cases left from 1998. Two cases were carried over into 2000.

Security Service Tribunal: 22 complaints in 1999. Investigation of 19 was completed, along with 12 cases left over from 1998. Three were carried over.

Intelligence Services Tribunal: Five complaints in 1999. All five were investigated along with four from 1998.

K3 Time taken to deal with a case, from first receipt to final disposal, and the time taken to implement the tribunal's decision. Cases can vary in complexity and there is no standard time to deal with each one.
K4 For appeal tribunals, the percentage of appeals which succeed. These are not appeal tribunals.
K5 Managerial structures for the tribunal administration: Interception of Communications Tribunal: Para 6, schedule 1, Interception of Communications Act 1985.

Security Service Tribunal: Para 6, Schedule 2, Security Services Act 1989.

Intelligence Services Tribunal: Para 6, Schedule 2, Intelligence Services Act 1994.

K6 How tribunal outcomes are fed back into departmental/agency decision-making, and used to identify and correct problems with the substantive law, or departmental policies and service delivery? No complaints upheld to date.
K7 Nature and scope of current ICT systems, and any major plans for improvement. No bespoke IT systems due to minimal caseload.
K8 How the tribunal(s) fit in the department's Modernising Government strategy. Tribunals now abolished to be replaced by one more accessible tribunal.
K9 Numbers and grades of staff engaged on providing administrative support to the tribunal. One HEO to cover the three tribunals.
K12 Performance and user satisfaction measures in the tribunal. None.
K13 Arrangements for assistance for users, legal or otherwise (including legal aid). Legal representation is permitted but legal aid is not available.
K14 Arrangements for providing hearings (including their locations). No provision for hearings. cases dealt with on a paper basis.
K15 The extent to which the tribunal's practices and procedures have been reviewed for conformity to ECHR requirements, and any particular concerns which have been identified. Tribunals have been abolished and replaced with the ECHR-compliant Investigatory Powers Tribunal.
K16 Arrangements for appointing tribunal members, both legally and otherwise qualified. All members appointed by HM the Queen by Letters Patent, and on the recommendation of the Prime Minister.
K17 Number of members of the tribunal, by category of appointment and whether full-time or part-time (in the latter case, with an average number of sitting days each year); and rates of pay. For the three tribunals, two Presidents and six other members. (Paid 316 per day)
K18 Arrangements for training tribunal members, and the approach to and content of training. Tribunals now abolished.
K19 Arrangements for staff training. Tribunals now abolished.
K20 Resources expended on:  
a tribunal member salaries and expenses
b staff salaries and expenses
c system administration
d accommodation;
e tribunal member training
f staff training
  TOTAL: 70,000 (approximately) for all three tribunals.

Betting Levy Appeal Tribunal

Home Office

K1 Brief description of the tribunal's business. Interception of Communications Tribunal: Deals with complaints against the use of the power to intercept communications under the Interception of Communications Act 1985.

Security Service Tribunal: Deals with complaints against the actions of the Security Service

Intelligence Services Tribunal: Deals with complaints against the actions of SIS and GCHQ.

These tribunals have been replaced by the Investigatory Powers Tribunal (under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000) and exist now only to consider complaints made before 2 October 2000.

K2 Cases received:
Total disposals in the year:
     disputes resolved:
     otherwise disposed of:
Pending at the end of the year:
Interception of Communications Tribunal: 69 complaints in 1999. Investigation of 67 was completed, along with three cases left from 1998. Two cases were carried over into 2000.

Security Service Tribunal: 22 complaints in 1999. Investigation of 19 was completed, along with 12 cases left over from 1998. Three were carried over.

Intelligence Services Tribunal: Five complaints in 1999. All five were investigated along with four from 1998.

K3 Time taken to deal with a case, from first receipt to final disposal, and the time taken to implement the tribunal's decision. Cases can vary in complexity and there is no standard time to deal with each one.
K4 For appeal tribunals, the percentage of appeals which succeed. These are not appeal tribunals.
K5 Managerial structures for the tribunal administration: Interception of Communications Tribunal: Para 6, schedule 1, Interception of Communications Act 1985.

Security Service Tribunal: Para 6, Schedule 2, Security Services Act 1989.

Intelligence Services Tribunal: Para 6, Schedule 2, Intelligence Services Act 1994.

K6 How tribunal outcomes are fed back into departmental/agency decision-making, and used to identify and correct problems with the substantive law, or departmental policies and service delivery? No complaints upheld to date.
K7 Nature and scope of current ICT systems, and any major plans for improvement. No bespoke IT systems due to minimal caseload.
K8 How the tribunal(s) fit in the department's Modernising Government strategy. Tribunals now abolished to be replaced by one more accessible tribunal.
K9 Numbers and grades of staff engaged on providing administrative support to the tribunal. One HEO to cover the three tribunals.
K12 Performance and user satisfaction measures in the tribunal. None.
K13 Arrangements for assistance for users, legal or otherwise (including legal aid). Legal representation is permitted but legal aid is not available.
K14 Arrangements for providing hearings (including their locations). No provision for hearings. cases dealt with on a paper basis.
K15 The extent to which the tribunal's practices and procedures have been reviewed for conformity to ECHR requirements, and any particular concerns which have been identified. Tribunals have been abolished and replaced with the ECHR-compliant Investigatory Powers Tribunal.
K16 Arrangements for appointing tribunal members, both legally and otherwise qualified. All members appointed by HM the Queen by Letters Patent, and on the recommendation of the Prime Minister.
K17 Number of members of the tribunal, by category of appointment and whether full-time or part-time (in the latter case, with an average number of sitting days each year); and rates of pay. For the three tribunals, two Presidents and six other members. (Paid 316 per day)
K18 Arrangements for training tribunal members, and the approach to and content of training. Tribunals now abolished.
K19 Arrangements for staff training. Tribunals now abolished.
K20 Resources expended on:  
a tribunal member salaries and expenses
b staff salaries and expenses
c system administration
d accommodation;
e tribunal member training
f staff training
  TOTAL: 70,000 (approximately) for all three tribunals.


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