This snapshot, taken on
17/06/2010
, shows web content acquired for preservation by The National Archives. External links, forms and search may not work in archived websites and contact details are likely to be out of date.
 
 
The UK Government Web Archive does not use cookies but some may be left in your browser from archived websites.
royalnavy.mod.ukTop Class Employer with Top Class People
VIEW THE ROYAL NAVY BY:
people

Jobs

Ryan Ramsey | Live Chat Commanding Officer


About Ryan Ramsey

Hello - and welcome to my Live Chat.

I've been Commander of the submarine HMS Turbulent since November last year. I've spent the last 17 years as a Submarine Warfare Officer on both diesel electric and nuclear subs.

I'm very passionate about what I do. The submarine service is involved in everything from peacekeeping to engaging our enemies. Being the Captain of this submarine and commanding my crew is exceptionally rewarding.

A submarine is the most complex military craft - possibly more complex than a Space Shuttle! With my crew of 130 men, we're able to operate without any support for months. Just imagine how much food we need to take with us!

My career has allowed me to travel all over the world. I got to spend two years with the US Navy, as well as a two-year exchange with the Royal Netherlands Navy.

Traditionally, little is known about how submarines operate - we're known as the 'silent service'. But I hope to give you some understanding of what we do. So fire away!


TRANSCRIPT Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next

Question 21. Nick Sullivan: Hi Ryan, I am shortly going to apply to become an Officer in the Submarine Service. However, it looks to me as though the numbers of subs are going to be cut soon - the Swiftsure class is being phased out, the Trafalgar class will start to be decommissioned in the near future, and there are only going to be six Astute class to replace them. Will there be much demand for submariners in the future? I don't want to have missed the boat, if you'll pardon the awful pun. Many thanks, Nick Sullivan

22:13

Ryan Ramsey: in response to Question 21.

Hi Ryan,
I am shortly going to apply to become an Officer in the Submarine Service. However, it looks to me as though the numbers of subs are going to be cut soon - the Swiftsure class is being phased out, the Trafalgar class will start to be decommissioned in the near future, and there are only going to be six Astute class to replace them. Will there be much demand for submariners in the future? I don't want to have missed the boat, if you'll pardon the awful pun.

Many thanks,
Nick Sullivan

Hi Nick. Glad to hear you are shortly to join us - hopefully! You are correct in that there will shortly be a reduction in submarine numbers. We currently have the 4 Trident boats - the Vanguard class. These will remain in service and we are already planning their successors (for around 2029). The last S-boat Sceptre will run on for the next couple of years alongside the 7 Trafalgar class and these will gradually be replaced by the Astute class. We are lokking at having 7 Astutes. Astute is due to be operational by the autumn, with Ambush now crewing up. Behing her comes Artful and Audacious has just had her keel laid. The others have had names allocated - boat 5 Agamemnon - boat 6 Anson and boat 7 Ajax. It should be noted that whilst the final number will represent a reduction in past numbers, the capabilities of these truly modern submarines will be far in excess of anything we have seen before. And yes, there will still very much be a need for good men to crew them!

Question 22. ben: how often are ships deployed?

16:07

Ryan Ramsey: in response to Question 22.

how often are ships deployed?

Ben, ships are deployed according to Service needs across the globe.

Question 23. ed: Just woundering what is the useall time spent under the water in the submarine per mission or do you try to sailing on the surface if possible? Cheers Ed.

16:02

Ryan Ramsey: in response to Question 23.

Just woundering what is the useall time spent under the water in the submarine per mission or do you try to sailing on the surface if possible?
Cheers Ed.

No two patrols are ever the same, but on average we spend between two and three months away. If we are away for longer we tend to get a port visit to relax before we head back to sea. Although time on the surface is rare it does give the opportunity to get some fresh air!

Question 24. Jonathan Aitken: Allright Ryan, I submitted my application in today to become a seaman. Do you have any idea how long the application process takes? I want to get strated straight away but obviously I will need to be patient.

00:21

Ryan Ramsey: in response to Question 24.

Allright Ryan, I submitted my application in today to become a seaman. Do you have any idea how long the application process takes? I want to get strated straight away but obviously I will need to be patient.

Hi Jonathan. Well at least you have taken that first step by submitting your application. Quite honestly the waiting times vary greatly depending on your Branch of Choice (BOC). Your local Armed Forces Careers Office (AFCO) will certainly be able to give you all the guidance you need and give you an idea of how long the process will take.

Question 25. Nicolas: What career would i have to follow to became commander of a ship, a submarine or any other, are there specific careers or is it possible for any of them, cause i don´t think a medic for example can do that

16:09

Ryan Ramsey: in response to Question 25.

What career would i have to follow to became commander of a ship, a submarine or any other, are there specific careers or is it possible for any of them, cause i don´t think a medic for example can do that

Nicolas, you would need to join the Warfare Branch to be a Commanding Officer of a sea going unit.

Question 26. Rhys Thomas: Greetings from Shrivenham Commander Ramsey. Now that you have gone on to command a submarine what has been the biggest challenge that you have faced? Also what would be your best/worst experiences so far if you can narrow that down! I have read the Turbulent blog and think that's fantastic to get an insight to what goes on below.

16:04

Ryan Ramsey: in response to Question 26.

Greetings from Shrivenham Commander Ramsey. Now that you have gone on to command a submarine what has been the biggest challenge that you have faced? Also what would be your best/worst experiences so far if you can narrow that down! I have read the Turbulent blog and think that's fantastic to get an insight to what goes on below.

Rhys,
Great to hear from you. The biggest challenge has been managing the expectations of my crew and families with a dynamic programme. I think the BLOG sums up some of our experiences thus far. It has all been a fantastic experience.

Cheers Ryan

Question 27. Jonathan: Hi Ryan. Were you a volunteer to the submarine service? Does a submariner require different characteristics in terms of personality to their surface fleet counterparts?

16:02

Ryan Ramsey: in response to Question 27.

Hi Ryan. Were you a volunteer to the submarine service? Does a submariner require different characteristics in terms of personality to their surface fleet counterparts?

Jonathan,
Yes I was. A good question, those that join rarely leave, they enjoy what we do and how we do it. There are of course differences between ourselves and our surface brethren, but if you consider that we reflect a cross section of society you see all personalities both in submarines and surface ships.
Thanks
Ryan

Question 28. Will: What do you do when not at sea? Do you train, or do some intelligence work?

16:08

Ryan Ramsey: in response to Question 28.

What do you do when not at sea? Do you train, or do some intelligence work?

Our time alongside is importnat to us for many reasons, not least becuase it gives us the opportunity to spend time at home with friends and family. It is of course not all time off and we must make sure we are ready for our next patrol.
In order to achieve this we spend time in simulators practising the techniques we will use at sea. The time is also used to go on career courses to help us develop and achieve further qualifications. The boat must also be ready for the patrol so maintenance work takes place during each visit to ensure we are as prepared as we can be for the challenges we face at sea.

Question 29. Nick: Are there medical officers on board submarines, and there is any chance if i have a british citizenship but also from another EU country to join the service

16:12

Ryan Ramsey: in response to Question 29.

Are there medical officers on board submarines, and there is any chance if i have a british citizenship but also from another EU country to join the service

Nick, Medical Officers are usually embarked on Submarines for Patrols. You will need to have full British citisenship to serve on Submarines as a Medical Officer.

Question 30. Josh: Hi Ryan, I am very interested in applying to join the Royal Navy. I'm 20 years old. I speak fluent Spanish, could this give me any opportunities or specific career paths? Thanks.

16:14

Ryan Ramsey: in response to Question 30.

Hi Ryan,

I am very interested in applying to join the Royal Navy. I'm 20 years old. I speak fluent Spanish, could this give me any opportunities or specific career paths?

Thanks.

Josh, well having fluent Spanish will be very helpful when visiting Spanish speaking ports. As for specific career Paths there maybe opportunities to do exchange jobs in other countries but there is no specific language career path.

RYAN'S PROFILE

Name: Ryan Ramsey
Rank: Commander
Position: Commanding Officer

View Full Job Description

Pay Bracket: 65k - 76k
Current Post: HMS Turbulent