Skip navigation

National Database of Accredited Qualifications

Last updated on: 03/04/2008

What is the National Database of Accredited Qualifications?

Ofqual, in partnership with the regulators for Wales (DCELLS) and Northern Ireland (CCEA), launched an online database of accredited qualifications to replace openQUALS. The National Database of Accredited Qualifications (NDAQ) is a freely searchable website giving up-to-date information on all accredited qualifications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

NDAQ has lots of new functionality to enable learners, employers and educational institutes to find the qualification that best meets their needs. Some of the main features include:

  • descriptions of each newly accredited unit and qualification
  • examples of progression routes and job roles
  • details of assessment methods and grading systems used for each newly accredited unit and qualification
  • downloadable information on qualifications
  • links to major educational websites
  • an enhanced search facility
  • details of qualifications that have now expired, ie passed their accreditation end date.

To search for qualifications, visit the National Database of Accredited Qualifications (opens in new window) website.
 
How can I get my qualifications displayed on the National Database of Accredited Qualifications?

Your organisation needs to be an awarding body that is recognised by the regulatory bodies of England (Ofqual), Wales (DCELLS) and Northern Ireland (CCEA).
 
Once you have gained awarding body status, you may submit your qualification for accreditation.  Provided the qualification meets the regulators' requirements, it will then be available to view on the National Database of Accredited Qualifications.
 
Please view the related answers on recognition, accreditation, and approval to gather more information about the different processes.

Why does my qualification not show on the database when the accreditation end date has been extended?

There is a small time lag between approval of an extension date and updating the National Database of Accredited Qualifications, as all extensions of qualifications must be checked to make sure that they are in the best interest of the learner.

Either try again in a few days or contact the awarding body for confirmation of the extension. The awarding body may replace the qualification if there has been a change in the National Occupational Standards, or it may withdraw the qualification due to lack of take-up.

You can find a list of the contact details of the recognised awarding bodies by viewing the awarding body directory on the NDAQ (opens in new window) website.

Where can I find a list of awarding bodies that develop qualifications and recognise centres to deliver qualifications?

You can find a list of the different awarding bodies by using the awarding body directory on the NDAQ (opens in new window) website. This list also includes awarding body contact details, which you can use to ask questions about past examination papers, qualification content, and the location of centres where particular qualifications are available.

Why do some qualification numbers start with Q, some with 100/ and some with 500/ on the National Database of Accredited Qualifications?

This numbering helps to identify when the qualifications were initially accredited. The oldest qualification numbers started with a Q, then the qualification reference number became 100.

A web-based accreditation system was introduced in January 2006 to speed up the time taken to accredit qualifications.  These qualifications are identified with their unique qualification reference number starting with a 500.