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In this section * * * * *
Life Records*    
Service Records*    
Cemetery Records*    
Further Reading*    
       

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A 1937 photograph of the old fortifications at Diu in Gujarat.  Diu, once a former colonial possesstion of Portugual, was brought under Indian control in 1961.
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A 1937 photograph of the old fortifications at Diu in Gujarat. Diu, once a former colonial possesstion of Portugual, was brought under Indian control in 1961.
* Moving Here catalogue reference (RGS) S0001925
In 1510 the Portuguese Governor of India, Alfonso d'Albuquerque encouraged his countrymen to marry Indian women in order to establish Portuguese authority in India. The offspring of these mixed marriages between the Portuguese and Indians were known as Luso-Indians.

In its early days, the East India Company's Board of Directors did not allow families or wives to travel along with its officials and soldiers to India. The English missed the companionship of their women and many of them had relationships with Luso-Indian and Indian women.

The offspring of these mixed marriages and relationships are known as the Anglo-Indians. In 1687, the EIC encouraged marriages between European soldiers and Indian women, and even paid the mother of mixed offspring five rupees on the day the child was christened.

Until 1911 Anglo-Indians were universally known as Eurasians. For occupational purposes and as a point of differentiation from the Europeans and the Indians, they were designated Statutory Natives of India; while for the defence of Empire purposes, they were called European British Subjects.


*Life Records*top of page

Lists of some births, marriages and deaths in India are given in the Anglo-Indian newspapers of the time; also (from 1808 to 1844) some appear in the East India Register, which is held at the British Library, Oriental and India Office collection.

Selected extracts from the India Presidencies of Bengal, Bombay and Madras Ecclesiastical Returns of Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1713-1948 include Anglo-Indian details as well, which are held at the British Library, Oriental and India Office Collection.

The relevant church record transcriptions and indexes have been microfilmed by the *Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS).

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It is also worth checking the other printed works that are held at the British Library, OIOC:

  • A biographical index
  • Published Madras, Bombay and Bengal directories
  • Almanacs and calendars
  • Bengal Civil Servants 1798-1839 by Dodwell and Miles (1839)
  • Madras Civil Servants 1798-1839 by Dodwell and Miles (1839)
  • Register of Bengal civil servants 1790-1842
These works include the names of the European and East Indian inhabitants, as well as details of Anglo-Indians who served in the Indian civil service.


*Service Records*top of page

If you know the place name where your ancestor was stationed before 1858, then try to establish which presidency it came under, and consult the relevant presidency's printed sources as they may give more additional information.

The East India Company's army officers' and soldiers' service records and EIC's merchant seamen's service records are mainly held at the British Library, Oriental and India Office Collection. However, the service records of European British subjects (Anglo-Indians) who served in the Madras, Bengal and Bombay European regiments of the East India Company may be found in the National Archives record series WO 97.

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Indian medical orderlies attending to wounded soldiers
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Indian medical orderlies attending to wounded soldiers on stretchers outside a dressing station, Mesopotamia, during the First World War.
During the First World War the European British subjects served in the:

  • Indian Army Service Corps
  • Indian Ordnance Corps
  • Military Nursing for Women in India
Anglo-Indians had a reserved place for their community in the Indian Medical Department, which was an integral part of the British Army in India.

Under the Army Instruction (India) No. 325 of 1922 the Anglo-Indians who served in the Indian Defence Force were eligible for the award of the British War medal. They also served in the Mercantile Marine Services.

After independence many Anglo-Indians left India to join relatives in the United Kingdom. Many took out British citizenship in the period 1947-50 and then remained in India.

In India many were employed in the Union railways and customs, postal and telegraph services.

During the Kashmir campaign, they comprised over 50% of the fighter pilots in the Indian Air Force.

Anglo-Indian women worked as nurses, and most of Indian Airlines Corporation's stewardesses were Anglo-Indians.


*Cemetery Records*top of page

Cathy Day's website has an excellent guide to the cemetery records at: *members.ozemail.com.au/~clday/bacsa



*Further Reading*top of page

  • Ian Baxter, India Office Library and Records: A Brief Guide to Biographical Sources, British Library, 1990
  • Neville Taylor, Sources for Anglo-Indian Genealogy in the Library of the Society of Genealogists (Society of Genealogists, 1990)
  • E. Chatterton, Anglo-Indian and Eurasian Orgins (out of print, copies can be consulted at the BL)
  • Frank Anthony, Britain's Betrayal in India: The Story of the Anglo-Indian Community (1969) (out of print, copies can be consulted at the BL)
  • A. Gabb, The Anglo-Indian Legacy 1600-1947: A Brief Guide to British Raj India History (2nd edition, 2001)
  • C. Hawes, The Making of a Eurasian Community in British India 1773-1833 (1996) (out of print, copies can be consulted at the BL)
  • The Indiaman Magazine, the only genealogical and history magazine in the world about the British in India and southern Asia from 1600 to the 20th century. Read more at *http://www.indiaman.com.

Creators: Abi Husainy

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