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*Migration Histories > Jewish > Settling
* The Moves to the Suburbs 
 
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Cheetham Hill Road, once the centre of Manchester's Jewish community
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Cheetham Hill Road, once the centre of Manchester's Jewish community
* Moving Here catalogue reference (MJM) PD4055/15
Part of the spur to integration was the movement of immigrants from their first places of settlement to areas of better housing. During the 1890s, more prosperous immigrant industrialists had already moved into mansions in Higher Broughton, north of Cheetham Hill. The better paid immigrant workers, for their part, alongside workshop masters and shopkeepers moved to Hightown, an area of solid terraced property, also to the north.

From the late 1920s, detached housing was being built on a speculative basis in Crumpsall and Prestwich, attractive and still semi-rural suburbs to the north of Hightown. By the end of the Second World War, the residential centre of gravity of Manchester Jewry had moved decisively from Cheetham to Prestwich, which in 1938 could boast three synagogues. By the mid-1950s, this outward movement had reached Whitefield, where the first Jewish services were held in 1959 and the first purpose-built synagogue opened in 1968.

The inter-war and immediately post-war years also saw Jewish settlement consolidated on a much smaller scale to the south of the city. Since the 1840s there had always been Jewish families in the southern suburbs. In 1872 the South Manchester Synagogue had been established in Chorlton-on-Medlock.

From the 1890s onwards, many German-Jewish and Sephardi families, who had first settled to the north, moved across the city to what was seen as a more 'sophisticated' society. Some were doubtless persuaded to move by what they saw as an Eastern European 'invasion'.

By the late 1890s there were small Jewish colonies in Fallowfield, to which the South Manchester Synagogue moved in 1911, and in Withington and Didsbury, where there were two Sephardi congregations by the late 1920s.

More isolated Jewish communities developed in Sale, Hale and Bowdon. Immediately after the Second World War, extensive settlement began still further south, in the Cheshire townships of Cheadle and Gatley, where an orthodox synagogue, the Yeshurun, was opened in 1964 and a Reform synagogue, the Menorah, in 1972.

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Creators: Bill Williams

 
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