This snapshot, taken on
05/12/2013
, shows web content acquired for preservation by The National Archives. External links, forms and search may not work in archived websites and contact details are likely to be out of date.
 
 
The UK Government Web Archive does not use cookies but some may be left in your browser from archived websites.
*
*Migration Histories > Jewish > Culture and Festivals
* Passover in the migrants' new home 
 
*
'Next year in Jerusalem', the wish of countless generations of diaspora Jews.
*
*
'Next year in Jerusalem', the wish of countless generations of *diaspora Jews, is repeated each year in the Passover service.
* Moving Here catalogue reference (JML) 1984.118.3
For newly-arrived Jewish immigrants, Passover was one of the milestones in the year when they could both observe old traditions in a new land, and maintain some continuity with their previous existence. One part of the Passover service includes the wish, 'next year in Jerusalem', which, with its reminder of continuous wandering and searching for a lost homeland, must have seemed particularly poignant to new arrivals.

*
Collecting leaven, from an engaving dated c.1725.
*
*
Collecting leaven, from an engaving dated c.1725.
* Moving Here catalogue reference (JML) C 1997.1.p26
The festival was significant, not just as a religious event in its own right, but also for the way in which it marked out Jews as different from their host communities. The need to eat special food for eight days reinforced the strangeness of their customs - like holding the Sabbath on a different day, and the strict *kashrut food regulations - which already distinguished Jews from their non-Jewish neighbours.

*
Making matzos.
*
*
Making matzos.
* Moving Here catalogue reference (JML) C 1997.1.p263
The centrality of the festival in Jewish immigrant life was recognised by authors such as Israel Zangwill. In his book Children of the Ghetto, a crucial scene takes place during Passover, when the heroine has to make an agonising choice between her lover and her Judaism, and eventually decides on the latter.

The dietary requirements of the festival also affected working practices. Jewish bakers, for instance, would close their kitchens during the Passover period. Contracts in Jewish-run bakeries traditionally terminated at Passover, and restarted after the festival was over. Meanwhile matzot needed to be manufactured instead.

< Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next >


Creators: Carol Seigel

 
*