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Hydrogen

Woking Borough Council Fuel Cell System swimming pool image

Woking Borough Council Fuel Cell System
Surrey

The Woking Borough Council fuel cell system is a combined heat and power (CHP) system, which means that it produces both electricity and useable heat energy. The system has been working since December 2001 to supply heat and power to Woking Park.

The fuel cell in this system uses phosphoric acid as the electrolyte, natural gas reformed into hydrogen as the fuel, and oxygen taken directly from the air as the oxidant. The fuel cell is able to supply 200kW of electrical power. Future developments will see the fuel cell operating alongside other renewable energy sources such as solar power to provide a greater capacity.

Woking Park leisure centre uses hydrogen fuel cells to provide its energy: Photo courtesy of Woking Borough Council.

Planned fuel cell plant
Middlesbrough

In Middlehaven, a major inner-city redevelopment scheme in Middlesbrough, advanced fuel cells will help power an advanced combined heat and power (CHP) system. The power unit will contribute up to 2MW, with the hydrogen fuel coming from Middlesbrough's large petro-chemical industry.

Hy-Wire car

The General Motors Hy-wire has no internal combustion engine, instrument panel, brake or accelerator pedals – but it does have ample power, supplied by a GM fuel cell that runs on hydrogen. The world’s first drivable vehicle that combines a hydrogen fuel cell with drive-by-wire technology was introduced to the public at the Paris Motor Show in 2002. All of the car's power and control systems are contained within an 11-inch-thick skateboard-like chassis, maximizing the interior space for five occupants and their luggage.

The fuel cell stack produces available power of 94kW. Drive-by-wire means the driver controls the car electronically rather than mechanically, sending signals to the power unit and brakes from a simple control column.