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Department for Constitutional AffairsConstitution

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Home > Constitution > Royal & hereditary > Lord Mayoralty & Lord Provostship > Background information

The Convenors of Scottish local authorities are sometimes known as Provosts and in other instances, a Councillor may be appointed as the Provost of a town within the area of the local authority. References in these papers to Lord Mayoralty may be read as including Lord Provostship - please note, however, that those relating to elected Mayors are not appropriate to the Scottish context.


Golden Jubilee Competition

A competition for a grant of Lord Mayoralty/Lord Provostship to mark The Queen's Golden Jubilee was launched on 25 July 2001 with a closing date of 12 October 2001.

The details are contained in a press notice issued on 25 July.

Grant of Lord Mayoralty

Permission to use the title 'Lord Mayor' is a rare mark of distinction granted to a city by The Queen under the Royal Prerogative, acting on the advice of Ministers.

Additional Powers/Functions Conferred by Lord Mayoralty

The grant of a Lord Mayoralty confers no additional powers or functions on a town. It is purely honorific; a Lord Mayor takes precedence over a Mayor at functions, in processions etc.

Criteria

A Lord Mayoralty is not, and never has been, a right which can be claimed by a city fulfilling certain conditions. The use of specific criteria could lead to a city claiming a Lord Mayoralty as of right, which in turn might devalue the honour. All applications are considered on their individual merits.

Cities with Lord Mayors/Lord Provosts

Aberdeen
Belfast
Birmingham
Bradford
Bristol
Canterbury
Cardiff
Chester [1992]
Coventry
Dundee
Edinburgh
Exeter [2002]
Glasgow
Kingston-upon-Hull
Leeds
Leicester

Liverpool
London
Manchester
Newcastle-upon-Tyne
Norwich
Nottingham
Oxford
Plymouth
Portsmouth
Sheffield
Stoke-on-Trent
Swansea
Westminster
York

Frequently asked questions

How does a town apply for a Lord Mayoralty?

How often is a Lord Mayoralty granted?

How many Lord Mayoralties will be conferred for the Golden Jubilee?

Can anyone apply for their city to be granted a Lord Mayoralty?

Can cities appeal against the decision?

Who decides when there will be a competition?

Which Minister is responsible for advising The Queen?

Do the devolved administrations have a say?

What are the criteria?

What factors will be taken into account?

How is a Lord Mayoralty granted?

What advantages are there for cities in having a Lord Mayor?

Will the grant of a Lord Mayoralty conflict with the election of a mayor?

Who will be entitled to the title of 'Lord Mayor' where there is an elected local authority Mayor?

What form should applications take? Need they be professionally produced?

Will correspondence campaigns or lobbying by/on behalf of applicants influence the decision?

 

 

 


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